Single 4 ohm vs dual 2 ohm

hammock single or double layer

The Amok Draumr requires a thick, inflatable pad to even make the hammock work. No pad, no hammock.

The Amok Draumr requires a thick, inflatable pad to even make the hammock work. No pad, no hammock.

richtig mit jungs flirten

frau flirtet mit meinem freund Philip Werner’s recent post on  delivers some strong points about double-layer hammocks:

The two layers form a pocket that can be used to hold a foam or an inflatable sleeping pad. The pocket helps hold the insulation in place and gets it out of the living compartment where it can be clumsy to deal with.

I richtig mit jungs flirten like reading and following SectionHiker.com, because Philip is someone who has a breath of experience and I learn a lot from him. But he’s missing some key points here. While it is true a double-layer hammock helps hold a traditional sleeping pad in place, there are other key reasons to consider them, some more important to folks than others.

The Hammock Bliss Sky Bed has a pad sleeve or pocket that fits specific pad size.

The Hammock Bliss Sky Bed has a pad sleeve or pocket that fits specific pad size.

Benefits of a Double-Layer Hammock

  • Bug protection—Mosquitoes have been known to bite through single-layer hammocks (especially those with lighter fabrics) since the pressure from laying on the woven fabric can ease the fibers enough for their proboscis to poke through. A double-layer hammock provides a tighter cross-section of protection and is ideal in hot, muggy areas where bugs pose a real problem and you don’t need a pad or underquilt to stay warm.
  • Greater weight capacity—Adding another layer of fabric can increase the weight capacity by nearly 75%, depending on the fabric. This is actually the leading reason folks buy double-layer hammocks. According to, a double-layer 1.6 oz HyperD increases from 280 lbs to 448 lbs capacity. Going to a lighter weight 1.0 oz fabric only drops the total capacity to 430 lbs. This is a great option for big and tall campers who want the added weight capacity without adding significantly to the pack weight. Here is an example of a few basic hammocks (no mosquito netting) as a quick comparison:
    Hammock Dimensions Layer richtig mit jungs flirten Pack Weight Capacity
    FreeBird 120×60 in single layer 1.6 oz 11.22 oz 280 lbs
    FreeBird 120×60 in double layer 1.6/1.6 oz 21.84 oz 448 lbs
    FreeBird 120×60 in double layer 1.6/1.0 oz 17.86 oz 430 lbs
    Kammok Roo 120×67 in single layer 2.5 oz 24 oz 500 lbs
    ENO DoubleNest 112×74 in single layer 2.5 oz 19 oz 400 lbs
  • Lightweight Comfort—While any hammock is subjectively “comfortable,” some folks who want to go lighter with their gear often pick thinner fabrics that stretch. A lot. For some, too much stretching can be uncomfortable. Adding a double layer of light fabric reduces the overall stretch, increases the comfort, and still keeps the pack weight lower than other options.
  • Securing a Sleeping Pad—As Philip mentioned, a double layer hammock is a great option for pinching a pad in place. I want to clarify his point, however, that not all double-layer hammocks can hold all pad types (some even have the  and can’t hold pads), or hold multiple pads. Most double-layer hammocks are built without gusseting, making the layers absolutely flush once weight is applied. Adding really thick pads, or layering multiple pads actually causes pads to buckle and can be uncomfortable. One of the few double-layer hammocks I’m aware of that has a gusseted second fabric layer is the. The —essentially two hammocks sewn together—can be hung as a pseudo-double-layer hammock with a variable amount of gusseting. The and have de facto “pad sleeves” that will only accommodate a specific type of pad. If you choose a double-layer hammock to hold a pad, be sure to check if it has a pad sleeve, two true layers, or gusseting to ensure your insulation of choice will work.
warbonnet-ridgerunner-padsleeve

Many bridge-style camping hammocks, like the Warbonnet Ridgerunner shown here, include a pad sleeve that is an ideal match for a sleeping pad.

The Warbonnet Blackbird hammocks can be ordered with either a single or double layer depending on user preference.

The Warbonnet Blackbird hammocks can be ordered with either a single or double layer depending on user preference, which is usually sie sucht ihn quoka due to the increased weight capacity of the double-layer versions.

Benefits of a Single-layer Hammock

Basic, single-layer hammocks are the backbone of any modular hammock camping system are commonly used for recreational lounging. A single layer of fabric is the norm for hammocks, even camping hammocks. It is simple and efficient. Your options are almost unlimited, especially if you choose a cottage vendor who can make a custom hammock to fit your size, fabric choice, and suspension options.

For most folks, a single-layer hammock will be all they will ever need.

apriller-parachute-nylon-hammock-3

A simple, single-fabric layer hammock is the most-common and all that most folks will ever need. An attached (or separate) bug net and a tarp makes a hammock a viable camping shelter.

Which hammock style should you choose if you want to go camping?

Single Layer

  • You’re just starting out and don’t need/want to invest much in the sport.
  • Your goal is to hammock camp as simple, light, and fast as possible.
  • You don’t need the extra weight capacity.
  • You don’t need the extra bug protection.
  • You don’t plan to use a sleeping pad when camping (see notes below).

Double Layer

  • You’ll be camping in a temperate or tropical zone where your insulation needs will be low but need for bug protection is high.
  • You’ll be camping in freezing temperatures where you need to maximize insulation by using an under quilt and a pad/vapor barrier.
  • You want the lightest hammock available that still supports your weight and comfort needs.
  • You want the extra weight capacity a double layer provides.
  • You want to take advantage of the pad sleeve/layer (see notes below).
Folding the pad in half to insert into the foot end of the double layer hammock

Folding the pad in half to insert into the foot end of the double-layer hammock

A few notes about hammock insulation

Philip focuses much of his article on the insulation options for double- or single-layer hammocks. He makes valid points about sleeping pads and hammock under quilts, but I need to clarify a few things:

  • You don’t need a double-layer hammock if you want to use a pad. While a pad sleeve or double-layer can help hold a pad in place, they aren’t necessary, nor are they perfect at doing it. One of the best ways to use a pad in a hammock is to just put it inside your sleeping bag. This keeps the pad in place even better than a double-layer hammock because the pad always moves where you do.
  • Most folks use pads in hammocks. Under quilts are very popular with veteran hammock campers, but even the long-time hammock veterans started off with using sleeping pads. The reason? Pads work pretty good as an insulator, they’re inexpensive, and most likely you already own one. Some hangers never use or plan to use an under quilt. I recommend most beginners start off with a pad just to get a feel for how hammock camping works. Investing in an under quilt or a double-layer hammock shouldn’t be a barrier to hammock camping.
  • Many cottage vendors who sell under quilts are not building them on-demand. Most sell standard sizes and have them in stock. The larger cottage vendors like HammockGear.com and Warbonnet have ramped up production over the years to meet demand and are operating more like small manufacturers than a true “out-of-the-garage” one-person shop. The real challenge is that you don’t usually find under quilts in large retailers like REI except for the few mass-market varieties from ENO, Kammok, and Yukon Outfitters. When ordering from a cottage vendor, plan time for shipping. In the case where you’ve chosen a small cottage vendor who does build on-demand, you’ll have to wait for production too.
  • In most cases, you don’t need to buy multiple under quilts. If you’re like most folks and primarily do 3-season camping, a single under quilt will be all you’ll ever need. Gear junkies and folks who camp year-round or in extreme conditions may find it necessary to customize their gear closet to have a range of quilts for varying conditions. This is true of sleeping bags and top quilts too. However, under quilts have an advantage over sleeping bags in that they can be easily vented in way to make a 20°F-rated quilt perform like a 50°F-rated quilt. Because of the unique way an under quilt hangs below a hammock, most can be adjusted to provide more air flow. For gram-weenies, having multiple quilts is more about saving pack weight than worrying about being too warm.
  • Hammocks are not inherently more expensive, nor are double-layer hammocks inherently less expensive because they can hold a sleeping pad. You need very little to go hammock camping, in spite of the marketing hype from some companies to the contrary. If you are worried about using a pad, try the sleeping bag tip mentioned above or to learn more tips on staying warm in a hammock without breaking the bank.

  • 12-13-2012, 18:52

    You can get the support you like in either a single or double layer. Just get thicker, heavier fabric for the single layer. I have double 1.0 oz. hammocks that feel about the same as my single 1.9 oz. hammock. I have a single 2.6 oz. hammock that feels too hard for my taste. Others are loving their single layer M50 hammock with 0.7 oz. fabric. It's sort of like a "Sleep Number" bed commercial.

    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"


  • 12-14-2012, 07:19

    i like a double,it frees up options in personal changes.i feel it also will hold more weight,so would appeal to a wider variety of customers upon resale.the only down side would be the small amount of weight gain.if your in the real cold you might find a night or two that you say i think ill use my u q and pad.

    Last edited by hairbear; 12-14-2012 at 07:20. Reason: fat finger syndrome


  • 12-14-2012, 09:12

    I prefer a double layered hammock. The added weight isn't quite as bad as you might think. A doubled layered hammock weighs about seven oz more than a single layer. My 30" y 5' closed cell pad weighs about 10 oz, but my 3/4 under quilt weighs 17 oz. If you buy into the fact you need two layers for a sleeping pad, then there really isn't much difference in weight.


  • 12-14-2012, 11:07

    QuoteOriginally Posted by dakotaross View Post

    Except for bridge hammocks, pads are always a little bit squirelly in between the layers, so I actually find I like being on top of the pad so I can grab and adjust it. When using an UQ, its more efficient to have only a single layer, albeit minimally so.

    I personally haven't seen much difference in the lay for single/double layered hammocks, but might make a more significant difference the more you get up towards the top end of the weight capacity. (I'm 170)

    Pads are squirrelly even between double layers?

    .

    Mike

    Learn to survive and thrive in any situation, for you never know what might happen. Love family and friends passionately. Suffer no fool. Know your purpose in life and follow it with all your heart.


  • 12-14-2012, 11:21

    QuoteOriginally Posted by MDSH View Post

    Pads are squirrelly even between double layers?

    .

    I could see a slick nylon covered pad moving a bit, but the "Evazote" type CCF pads sold by our cottage manufacturers stay in place between layers and are difficult to move around on if you lay directly on them in a hammock.

    Two layers all the way if you plan to use a pad.

    If you decide against a pad later, the only "penalty" is a couple of ounces.

  • 12-14-2012, 12:39

    I like dbl layers over single layers simply because I find dbl to be firmer then single layers. Even with single weight fabrics that can hold my weight I still find dbl firmer then single layers. Ill pay the weight penalty for the comfort.

    Sometimes I like to hike and think, And sometimes I just like to hike.

    Hiking is'ent about waiting for the storm to pass its about learning to hike in the rain.

  • 12-14-2012, 16:29

    If you think you'll ever use a pad, get a double layer.

    "In your face space coyote"-HJS


  • 12-16-2012, 16:35

    Cool thanks everyone! I have no big concerns on weight since I am planning on mainly using it on my motorcycle trip. My biggest concern is it somehow didn't work as well with a underquilt in the future but I think that's more a misunderstanding since Hennessey uses the SS. I think I got it.

    Next question is has anyone used a thermarest basecamp 3 sleeping pad. Any suggestions on blowup vs foam type matts. My biggest concern is space (not milimeters but I don't want to carry too much strapped to my bike) and warmth. I think the hammock would be plenty comply for me without the matt but I'm looking for some layering between me and the coldish wind as I will be out for 6 weeks and don't want to be cold and miserable all night. After all that is taken into consideration next is price followed by comfort (I think they are all pretty comfortable). I am also a 230 pound guy and fairly broad so I am looking at the XL version of thermarest. Open to suggestions though


  • 12-17-2012, 07:43

    QuoteOriginally Posted by macinnisl View Post

    Cool thanks everyone! I have no big concerns on weight since I am planning on mainly using it on my motorcycle trip. My biggest concern is it somehow didn't work as well with a underquilt in the future but I think that's more a misunderstanding since Hennessey uses the SS. I think I got it.

    Next question is has anyone used a thermarest basecamp 3 sleeping pad. Any suggestions on blowup vs foam type matts. My biggest concern is space (not milimeters but I don't want to carry too much strapped to my bike) and warmth. I think the hammock would be plenty comply for me without the matt but I'm looking for some layering between me and the coldish wind as I will be out for 6 weeks and don't want to be cold and miserable all night. After all that is taken into consideration next is price followed by comfort (I think they are all pretty comfortable). I am also a 230 pound guy and fairly broad so I am looking at the XL version of thermarest. Open to suggestions though

    You should look at some of the Exped insulated mats:

    The problem with the thermarest pads is they don't have much insulation and tend to feel cold when the temperature drops. Of course, it all depends on how cold things will get on your trip. Plus, some people are quite happy with the thermarest pads, I've just never felt warm with them.

  • 12-18-2012, 09:24

    QuoteOriginally Posted by MDSH View Post

    Pads are squirrelly even between double layers?

    For a gathered end hammock, trying to get a flat diagonal lay... in my opinion, yes, they are alway squirrelly.

    QuoteOriginally Posted by gmcttr View Post

    I could see a slick nylon covered pad moving a bit, but the "Evazote" type CCF pads sold by our cottage manufacturers stay in place between layers and are difficult to move around on if you lay directly on them in a hammock.

    Two layers all the way if you plan to use a pad.

    If you decide against a pad later, the only "penalty" is a couple of ounces.

    True, if you find like me that you didn't need the double layer, then its a relatively small penalty, both in terms of weight and cost.

    And truly, part of my issue is using an air pad which I take for just-in-case purposes. I can't sleep on the ground on any other pad. If you don't need a pad for this purpose, I'd squeeze every cent you can to get an underquilt.

    QuoteOriginally Posted by Beast 71 View Post

    If you think you'll ever use a pad, get a double layer.

    Different strokes I guess. I followed much of the same advice and found it didn't work for me. If you don't need the double layer for weight capacity purposes, then a single layer is lighter and costs less, leaving more room in your pack and your budget for an underquilt.

  • 04-02-2016, 23:02

    What's the advantages of double over single besides keeping a pad from slipping or mosquitos from biting you on the butt??....


  • 04-02-2016, 23:07

    Inceased weight capacity.
    Many not quite ready to drop the coin on an UQ will usually try and make a pad work. Some say the double layer helps with that. My first hammock was a double and the pad was still a pain in the butt.


  • 04-03-2016, 00:55

    Understand added weight capacity...which translates to a heavier hammock which means more pack weight...just a few oz.s I know but....thanks for the reply


  • 04-03-2016, 04:31

    I like double layer hammocks for several reasons.

    1. I need a pretty firm hammock, but I prefer nylon over polyester. This means 1.9oz minimum. A 1.0oz double layer hammock is only a little bit heavier but offers more options than a single layer.
    2. Even if you use an underquilt, it's easier to supplement with a pad or other insulation. I sleep very cold and even with the warmest underquilt there is always a tiny gap between me/the hammock and the underquilt in some place. If it's ~60° and over I don't notice, but below I often feel uncomfortable and it really helps to put something between the layers.
    3. I also use the layers to dry out clothes (mostly socks) when hiking. This way, they don't steal my body warmth because they're not in contact with me directly, but the warmth reliably dries them out until the next morning.

    So in conclusion, if you don't need/want a firm hammock and sleep warm (enough) with a warm enough underquilt, a double layer hammock likely doesn't make much sense for you.


  • 04-03-2016, 07:21

    QuoteOriginally Posted by hutzelbein View Post


    So in conclusion, if you don't need/want a firm hammock and sleep warm (enough) with a warm enough underquilt, a double layer hammock likely doesn't make much sense for you.

    I didn't have to write a thing. Thanks Hutelbein!

    Seriously though, I went with a non-integrated bugnet that surrounds me 360˚, so the layers of my hammock is negligent there, sie sucht ihn quoka although I've heard it has helped others who have the integrated bugnet.

    I do like the stretch of my 1.1oz single layer. Anything too stiff and I can't sleep.

    I also knew I'd end up with an UQ, and that if I absolutely needed to supplement with a pad it would be an emergency and I could stick it in the hammock with me (I prefer to carry more down than a pad) - people tend to put them between the layers of their double Layer (DL).

    Plus there's the weight savings of having only one layer. So, I 'm quite happy with my single layer.

  • 04-03-2016, 07:38

    I originally went with a double because I thought it would be more versatile. But, I recently switched to a single to save weight, and the second layer never proved useful to me.


  • 04-03-2016, 13:05

    I started always getting double but have never used the feature when camping. I use an UQ in a sock or with an UQP. BUT - for a day hike hammock, it might be more useful. Even on warm days, a little breeze can be felt under the hammock. in that case, having a sleeve to corral some sort of pad/insulation could be useful. So when camping, I've never used the DL feature. But when on a day hike, it can make the rest/lunch stop more comfortable it there is any kind of breeze.


  • 04-03-2016, 15:32

    I appreciate everyone's replies and helpful insight so far......keep em coming.


  • 04-04-2016, 21:51

    Really like the double layer...less stretch does it for me. Plus the pad option has worked well. If it's going to be really cold I can bring along a windshield reflector and shove it in there. For mild temps I often use a Multi-mat which is a thin pad sorta thing, works well.

    Not a gram counter.


  • 04-05-2016, 07:13

    i also am not a gram counter, but i like the single layer over the double. the pad thing is lame, i never liked it, i never was able to make any of the three i HAD work in the dl or in the single under me. never. nothin doin. the added capacity is nice when you have like a big dog or a small girlfriend, but really only for that. the nanoseeum sock does for skeeters, the pluq enhanced by space blanket (nearly) does for insulation (currently). can't speak to the stretch in heavier fabrics, though im looking at discovering soonish.

    J-Bend HERE -> http://youtu.be/Rk-P-MVnMPk
    J. Garcia
    QuoteOriginally Posted by Shug Emery

    The only thing perfect in this hammock world is the sleep


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Zahra Doejune 2, 2017
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Morbi gravida, sem non egestas ullamcorper, tellus ante laoreet nisl, id iaculis urna eros vel turpis curabitur.
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