Meine stadt rheine singles

single vs double layer hammock

The Amok Draumr requires a thick, inflatable pad to <a href=freie presse zschopau partnersuche even make the hammock work. No pad, no hammock." width="900" height="675" data-recalc-dims="1" />

The Amok Draumr requires a thick, inflatable pad to even make the hammock work. No pad, no hammock.

schwarzes brett bremen bekanntschaften

Philip Werner’s recent post on  delivers some strong points about double-layer hammocks:

The two layers form a pocket that can be used to hold a foam or an inflatable sleeping pad. The pocket helps hold the insulation in place and schwarzes brett bremen bekanntschaften gets it out of the living compartment where it can be clumsy to deal with.

I like reading and following SectionHiker.com, because Philip is someone who has a breath of experience and I learn a lot from him. But he’s missing some key points here. While it is true a double-layer hammock helps hold a traditional sleeping pad in place, there are other key reasons to consider them, some more important to folks than others.

The Hammock Bliss Sky Bed has a pad sleeve or pocket that fits specific pad size.

The Hammock Bliss Sky Bed has a pad sleeve or pocket that fits specific pad size.

Benefits of a Double-Layer Hammock

  • Bug protection—Mosquitoes have been known to bite through single-layer hammocks (especially those with lighter fabrics) since the pressure from laying on the woven fabric can ease the fibers enough for their proboscis to poke through. A double-layer hammock provides a tighter cross-section of protection and is ideal in hot, muggy areas where bugs pose a real problem and you freie presse zschopau partnersuche don’t need a pad or underquilt to stay warm.
  • Greater weight capacity—Adding another layer partnersuche de profil löschen of fabric can increase the weight capacity by nearly 75%, depending on the fabric. This is actually the leading reason folks buy double-layer hammocks. According to, a double-layer 1.6 oz HyperD increases from 280 lbs to 448 lbs capacity. Going to a lighter weight 1.0 oz fabric only drops the total capacity to 430 lbs. This is a great option for big and tall campers who want the added weight capacity without adding significantly to the pack weight. Here is an example of a few basic hammocks (no mosquito netting) as a quick comparison:
    Hammock Dimensions Layer Pack Weight Capacity
    FreeBird 120×60 in single layer 1.6 oz 11.22 oz 280 lbs
    FreeBird 120×60 in double layer 1.6/1.6 oz 21.84 oz 448 lbs
    FreeBird 120×60 in double layer 1.6/1.0 oz 17.86 oz 430 lbs
    Kammok Roo 120×67 in single layer 2.5 oz 24 oz 500 lbs
    ENO DoubleNest 112×74 in single layer 2.5 oz 19 oz 400 lbs
  • Lightweight Comfort—While any hammock is subjectively “comfortable,” some folks who want to go lighter with their gear often pick thinner fabrics that stretch. A lot. For some, too much stretching can be uncomfortable. Adding a double layer of light fabric reduces the overall stretch, increases the comfort, and still keeps the pack weight lower than other options.
  • Securing a Sleeping Pad—As Philip mentioned, a double layer hammock is a great option for pinching a pad in place. I want to clarify his point, however, that not all double-layer hammocks can hold all pad types (some even have the  and can’t hold pads), or hold multiple pads. Most double-layer hammocks are built without gusseting, making the layers absolutely flush once weight is applied. Adding really thick pads, or layering multiple pads actually causes pads to buckle and can be uncomfortable. One of the few double-layer hammocks I’m aware of that has a gusseted second fabric layer is the. The —essentially two hammocks sewn together—can be hung as a pseudo-double-layer hammock with a variable amount of gusseting. The and have de facto “pad sleeves” that will only accommodate a specific type of pad. If you choose a double-layer hammock to hold a pad, be sure to check if it has a pad sleeve, two true layers, or gusseting to ensure your insulation of choice will work.
warbonnet-ridgerunner-padsleeve

Many bridge-style camping hammocks, like the Warbonnet Ridgerunner shown here, include a pad sleeve that is an ideal match for a sleeping pad.

The Warbonnet Blackbird hammocks can be ordered with either a single or double layer depending on user preference.

The Warbonnet Blackbird hammocks can be ordered with either a single or double layer depending on user preference, which is usually due to the increased weight capacity of the double-layer versions.

Benefits of a Single-layer Hammock

Basic, single-layer hammocks are the backbone of any modular hammock camping system are commonly used for recreational lounging. A single layer of fabric is the norm for hammocks, even camping hammocks. It is simple and efficient. Your options are almost unlimited, especially if you choose a cottage vendor who can make a custom hammock to fit your size, fabric choice, and suspension options.

For most folks, a single-layer hammock will be all they will ever need.

apriller-parachute-nylon-hammock-3

A simple, single-fabric layer hammock is the most-common and all that most folks will ever need. An attached (or separate) bug net and a tarp makes a hammock a viable camping shelter.

Which hammock style should you choose if you want to go camping?

Single Layer

  • You’re just starting out and don’t need/want to invest much in the sport.
  • Your goal is to hammock camp as simple, light, and fast as possible.
  • You don’t need the extra weight capacity.
  • You don’t need the extra bug protection.
  • You don’t plan to use a sleeping pad when camping (see notes below).

Double Layer

  • You’ll be camping in a temperate or tropical zone where your insulation needs will be low but need for bug protection is high.
  • You’ll be camping in freezing temperatures where you need to maximize insulation by using an under quilt and a pad/vapor barrier.
  • You want the lightest hammock available that still supports your weight and comfort needs.
  • You want the extra weight capacity a double layer provides.
  • You want to take advantage of the pad sleeve/layer (see notes below).
Folding the pad in half to insert into the foot end of the double layer hammock

Folding the pad in half to insert into the foot end of the double-layer hammock

A few notes about hammock insulation

Philip focuses much of his article on the insulation options for double- or single-layer hammocks. He makes valid points about sleeping pads and hammock under quilts, but I need to clarify a few things:

  • You don’t need a double-layer hammock if you want to use a pad. While a pad sleeve or double-layer can help hold a pad in place, they aren’t necessary, nor are they perfect at doing it. One of the best ways to use a pad in a hammock is to just put it inside your sleeping bag. This keeps the pad in place even better than a double-layer hammock because the pad always moves where you do.
  • Most folks use pads in hammocks. Under quilts are very popular with veteran hammock campers, but even the long-time hammock veterans started off with using sleeping pads. The reason? Pads work pretty good as an insulator, they’re inexpensive, and most likely you already own one. Some hangers never use or plan to use an under quilt. I recommend most beginners start off with a pad just to get a feel for how hammock camping works. Investing in an under quilt or a double-layer hammock shouldn’t be a barrier to hammock camping.
  • Many cottage vendors who sell under quilts are not building them on-demand. Most sell standard sizes and have them in stock. The larger cottage vendors like HammockGear.com and Warbonnet have ramped up production over the years to meet demand and are operating more like small manufacturers than a true “out-of-the-garage” one-person shop. The real challenge is that you don’t usually find under quilts in large retailers like REI except for the few mass-market varieties from ENO, Kammok, and Yukon Outfitters. When ordering from a cottage vendor, plan time for shipping. In the case where you’ve chosen a small cottage vendor who does build on-demand, you’ll have to wait for production too.
  • In most cases, you don’t need to buy multiple under quilts. If you’re like most folks and primarily do 3-season camping, a single under quilt will be all you’ll ever need. Gear junkies and folks who camp year-round or in extreme conditions may find it necessary to customize their gear closet to have a range of quilts for varying conditions. This is true of sleeping bags and top quilts too. However, under quilts have an advantage over sleeping bags in that they can be easily vented in way to make a 20°F-rated quilt perform like a 50°F-rated quilt. Because of the unique way an under quilt hangs below a hammock, most can be adjusted to provide more air flow. For gram-weenies, having multiple quilts is more about saving pack weight than worrying about being too warm.
  • Hammocks are not inherently more expensive, nor are double-layer hammocks inherently less expensive because they can hold a sleeping pad. You need very little to go hammock camping, in spite of the marketing hype from some companies to the contrary. If you are worried about using a pad, try the sleeping bag tip mentioned above or to learn more tips on staying warm in a hammock without breaking the bank.


This keeps the pad from shifting on you as much. Pads are somewhat unruly under your torso and placing them inside the double layer generally makes them easier to sleep on, but even with the double layer, pads will still be somewhat uncomfortable as they will still bend and buckle and poke and feel too narrow in an end-gathered style of hammock like the Blackbird or XLC and so the most comfortable option by far is an underquilt if you can afford one.

A Bridge-style hammock like our Ridgerunner is a different style of hammock that does work very well with a pad, in the RR a pad will be just as comfortable as an underquilt will be. The space between the layers of the BB and XLC is the same size as the hammock body itself and can handle just about any sized standard camping pad up to the size of the Exped 9.

Some folks like inflateable pads over closed cell foam. Single vs double layer hammock using an air pad be sure to let about half the air out for comfort. Due to the above noted drawbacks of pads, many people will instead use underquilts as their primary bottom insulation instead.

For more information on quilts see Bottom Insulation Which one should choose?

Both have plenty of storage space. The RR is best suited for smaller folks, users over may have issues with the hammock feeling too narrow or constrictive and may be better suited for the XLC. The following describes a detailed setup method that should result in comfort vs.

Since the foot end needs to be significantly higher, the easiest way to achieve this is often to just position the hammock much closer to the foot tree AND attach the webbing to the foot tree at head height or above. This allows the fabric under your legs to spread out properly when laying single vs double layer hammock the diagonal.

The hammock is much closer to the foot tree, and also note the upward angle of the suspension straps, you want to shoot for the suspension running upward at roughly 30 deg angle for any single vs double layer hammock. You generally will raise a hammock not by tightening the suspension but by raising it on the tree. A simple test can be done once you are in the hammock… if the ridgeline seems like it is guitar-string tight see Blackbird single vs double layer hammock video to see me doing this test then the hammock is probably too tight.

Tightening the suspension tightens up the ridgeline and loosening the suspension loosens the ridgeline. Never leave the hammock in single vs double layer hammock sunlight for prolonged periods. UV rays degrade and weaken any synthetic fabric.

Regularly inspect the hammock and suspension for wear, and always hang close to the ground. If you use a hammock as a ground-shelter, always use a ground-cloth and pad underneath to protect the hammock body from abrasion. Always make sure the area you are camping in is free of overhead hazards such as dead trees and branches before hanging the hammock, especially if you windy conditions. If you use the Blackbird or XLC as a chair sitting sideways with your legs hanging over the zipperavoid leaning back against the shelf seam.

You might set the suspension slightly tighter as well, closer to a 25 deg angle. There is a built-in neck support, Most like to lay with their single vs double layer hammock on that high spot and their head in the slight divot behind it.

Subscribe to our newsletter?


Jul 22,  · We often get quizzed about the difference and purposes of double layers and single layer hammocks and this post is designed to cut through the red tape and.

Many backpacking-style hammocks come in double layer or single layer models. How do you decide which hammock to get and what are the consequences of choosing one type over the other? A double layer hammock is so-called because the part you lie on has two layers of fabric. The two layers form a pocket that can be used to hold a foam or an sleeping pad.

The pocket helps hold the insulation in place and gets it out of the living compartment single vs double layer hammock it can be clumsy to deal with. The second layer of fabric also makes the hammock stronger, so it can hold a heavier person than a single layer hammock. The chief benefit of using a double layer hammock is that you can use inexpensive insulation like closed cell foam or inflatable sleeping pads with it.

The pad may move around and has to be realigned single vs double layer hammock time you get up at night to pee. Most single layer hammock users use a underquilt instead, which hangs underneath your hammock to trap your body heat and keep you warm at night. But underquilts are a lot more expensive to use as hammock insulation than foam or insulated pads.

You may also want to several underquilt that are rated for different temperatures ranges for example: You can decide whether you want an additional 0 or 20 degree, cold weather underquilt later. The weight difference between the two is less significant than with a colder weather underquilt, while synthetic underquilts are significantly less expensive and take less time to manufacture.

If you make a purchase after clicking on the links above, a portion of sale helps support this site at no additional cost to you. I purchased a double layer Warbonnet Ridge Runner this spring and single vs double layer hammock summer have single vs double layer hammock using either a open cell inflatable pad a piece of reflectix as my bottom insulation.

Both have worked fine for me through the summer. I wanted better insulation for the nights we will be dealing with. I will try to post after the trip to let you know how it works out. Let me know how this single vs double layer hammock be doing a thru hike of the LT and wanted to use the warbonnet blackbird xlc double layer 1.

That is what I did when I was starting out. I have a Warbonnet Ridge Runner and think it is a great hammock. I have tried, however, to use an inflatable pad between the layers and found it to slide around, sometimes ending up on the side of the hammock. I thought that clipping it in somehow would be the best solution to the problem.

I prefer my bear taco hammock and underquilt, I have used it close to freezing with some warm clothing. I found it much warmer than my last underquilt. I tried pads and sleeping bags but found them awkward and uncomfortable in a hammock. I was still cold when the temps drooped single vs double layer hammock night.

There is no comparison to the warmth and comfort of an underquilt in my book. Your email address will not be published. Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. Notify me of new posts by email. How to Choose Between Them. Underquilts are normally used to insulate the bottom of single layer hammocks. Photo Courtesy of Mike Stivers. Most Popular Searches hammock double layer.

Previous Bare Boxer Contender: A Small Day Bear Rick September 16, at Philip Werner September 16, at BK September 16, at Josh September 18, at 5: DR September 16, at 2: Tom F September 21, at 9: Doc October 2, at 7: Single vs double layer hammock a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

No duplication without permission.


Eno Singlenest vs Eno Doublenest Best Review and Comparison

Some more links:
-
Nov 12,  · A discussion on Single Layer and Double Layer hammocks. Which one works best for you? angelikahaymann.decom For this edition of SinChats I mull over the.
-
Join or Login Close. Home: People.
-
Join or Login Close. Home: People.
-
Join or Login Close. Home: People.
-
Nov 12,  · A discussion on Single Layer and Double Layer hammocks. Which one works best for you? angelikahaymann.decom For this edition of SinChats I mull over the.
-

Underquilts are normally used to insulate the bottom of single layer hammocks, Photo Courtesy of Mike Stivers.Underquilts are normally used to insulate the bottom of single layer hammocks.

Many backpacking-style hammocks come in double layer or single layer models. How do you decide which hammock to get and what are the consequences of choosing one type over the other?

Double Layer Hammocks

A double layer hammock is so-called because the part you lie on has two layers of fabric. The two layers form a pocket that can be used to hold a foam or an inflatable sleeping pad. The pocket helps hold the insulation in place and gets it out of the living compartment where it can be clumsy to deal with. The second layer of fabric also makes the hammock stronger, so it can hold a heavier person than a single layer hammock.

The double layer hammock has an internal sleeve which can hold a foam or inflatable pad for more back insulation.A double layer hammock has an internal sleeve which can hold a foam or inflatable pad for more back insulation.

The chief benefit of using a double layer hammock is that you can use inexpensive insulation like closed cell foam or inflatable sleeping pads with it. Chances are you already own some of these, like a,, or an. As it gets colder, you can layer several of these pads in the hammock’s pad pocket for more insulation or use a pad/underquilt combination.

Single Layer Hammocks

In a single layer hammock, there’s only one layer of fabric underneath you. While this makes the hammock lighter weight, it also means that there isn’t a separate pocket to hold additional sleep insulation. While you can try to lie on top of a pad in a single layer hammock, most people find it very frustrating to position properly (since you’re lying on the pad you’re trying to reposition.) The pad may move around and has to be realigned every time you get up at night to pee.

Most single layer hammock users use a underquilt instead, which hangs underneath your hammock to trap your body heat and keep you warm at night. But underquilts are a lot more expensive to use as hammock insulation than foam or insulated pads. You may also want to buy several underquilt that are rated for different temperatures ranges (for example: 0-20 degrees and 40-70 degrees.)

Most of the hammock underquilts available today are made by small manufacturers including,, or on a custom, one-off basis which has limited availability. Mass market manufacturers such as,, and others have also started selling underquilts, but prices remain relatively high.

While underquilts are very comfortable once you dial in your hammock suspension system and they’re highly compressible for packing in a backpack, buying a single layer hammock can be a much more expensive proposition than buying a double layer hammock and using less expensive bottom insulation with it.

While full length quilts are desireable for sleeping in winter conditions, you can save money by using a 3/4 or 2/3 length underquilt in warmer weather. While full length quilts are desirable for sleeping in winter conditions, you can save money by using a 3/4 or 2/3 length underquilt in warmer weather.

How to Choose Between Them: Advice

->If gear weight is your primary concern and cost is less important, get a single layer hammock and a 40 degree underquilt. You can decide whether you want an additional 0 or 20 degree, cold weather underquilt later.

->If you want to save money, consider getting a 40 degree synthetic insulated underquilt instead of one insulated with duck or goose down. The weight difference between the two is less significant than with a colder weather underquilt, while synthetic underquilts are significantly less expensive and take less time to manufacture. You can also save money by buying a 3/4 underquilt, instead of a full length model.

->If the added cost of a underquilt is uncomfortable and gear weight is less of an issue, go with a double layer hammock. Sleeping on a foam pad inside the pad pocket is still quite comfortable and it’s easy to add or reduce the degree of warmth they provide by adding, mixing, and matching pads to meet your comfort needs, affordably.

Support SectionHiker.com, where we actually field test the products we review. If you make a purchase after clicking on the links above, a portion of the sale helps support this site at no additional cost to you.

Most Popular Searches

  • double layer sleeping bag vs single layer
Zahra Doe Morbi gravida, sem non egestas ullamcorper, tellus ante laoreet nisl, id iaculis urna eros vel turpis curabitur.

3 Comments

Zahra Doejune 2, 2017
Morbi gravida, sem non egestas ullamcorper, tellus ante laoreet nisl, id iaculis urna eros vel turpis curabitur.
Zahra Doejune 2, 2017
Morbi gravida, sem non egestas ullamcorper, tellus ante laoreet nisl, id iaculis urna eros vel turpis curabitur.
Zahra Doejune 2, 2017
Morbi gravida, sem non egestas ullamcorper, tellus ante laoreet nisl, id iaculis urna eros vel turpis curabitur.

Leavy Reply

Your Name (required) Your Name (required) Your Message