Sun, 21 Sep 2014 11:06:25 GMT
Solar Tornados, Volcanos, Space-Weather | S0 News Sept 21,...
Read More »
Biodynamic Gardening - Page 2
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 49 of 49

Thread: Biodynamic Gardening

  1. View Post #26
    Sweden Member JulietsBleedingToo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 8 2011
    Location
    The stars and to the left...
    Posts
    43
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    670
    Thanked 84 Times
    in 34 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Thank you Dex.

    Maybe I am in the wrong thread,but;

    Are sprouts from any seed edible? Sprouts from Peas,Beans etc? Does anyone know?


  2. View Post #27
    United States Member Brook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 10 2012
    Posts
    74
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 82 Times
    in 29 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by JulietsBleedingToo View Post
    Thank you Dex.

    Maybe I am in the wrong thread,but;

    Are sprouts from any seed edible? Sprouts from Peas,Beans etc? Does anyone know?
    Sprouting the seeds of health


    Sprouted foods have been part of the diet of many ancient races for thousands of
    years. Even to this day, the Chinese retain their fame for delicious mung bean sprouts. Sprouts provide all the essential vitamins and minerals. They should form a vital component of our diet. Sprouting requires no constant care but only an occasional sprinkling of water.
    Research shows that sprouts are a veritable fountain of youth. Sprouts abound with antioxidants, they are full of protein, chlorophyll, vitamins, minerals and amino acids. Broccoli sprouts have been found to contain 50 times as much of the antioxidant sulfurophane as mature broccoli. Wheat Grass juice is the closest substance to hemoglobin known and is therefore a phenomenal blood purifier and liver de-toxifier. Sprouts contain enzymes, giving your body a much needed rest as they digest themselves – invigorating you while requiring no help from your body to process them. New research indicates that peanut sprouts reduce harmful cholesterol and that sunflower, buckwheat and grain sprouts dramatically improve the quality of life of diabetics. The list goes on and on.
    All edible grains, seeds and legumes can be sprouted. Generally the following are used for sprouting :
    Grains: Wheat, maize, ragi, bajra and barley.
    Seeds: Alfalfa seeds, radish seeds, fenugreek seeds, carrot seeds, coriander seeds,
    pumpkin seeds and muskmelon seeds.
    Legumes: Mung, Bengal gram, groundnut and peas.
    Alfalfa, as the name in Arabic signifies, is the king of all sprouts. Grown as a plant, its roots are known to burrow as much as 12 meters into the subsoil to bring up valuable trace minerals of which manganese is especially important to health and digestion ; it is a vital component of human insulin. Apart from minerals, alfalfa is also a rich source of vitamins A,B,C,E and K and amino acids. Sesame seeds are another good source of nourishment. They contain all the essential amino acids in their 20 per cent protein content and higher concentration of calcium than does milk. They are high in letichin, unsaturated fats, vitamin E and vitamin B complex, besides other live nutrients.

    Rest of the article here: http://ybertaud9.wordpress.com/2012/...eds-of-health/





  3. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Brook For This Useful Post:

    Charles (15th April 2012), Dex (15th April 2012), Gardener (15th April 2012), JulietsBleedingToo (15th April 2012), lightblue (15th April 2012), Raven (15th April 2012)

  4. View Post #28
    Sweden Member JulietsBleedingToo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 8 2011
    Location
    The stars and to the left...
    Posts
    43
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    670
    Thanked 84 Times
    in 34 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Brook View Post
    Sprouting the seeds of health


    Sprouted foods have been part of the diet of many ancient races for thousands of
    years. Even to this day, the Chinese retain their fame for delicious mung bean sprouts. Sprouts provide all the essential vitamins and minerals. They should form a vital component of our diet. Sprouting requires no constant care but only an occasional sprinkling of water.
    Research shows that sprouts are a veritable fountain of youth. Sprouts abound with antioxidants, they are full of protein, chlorophyll, vitamins, minerals and amino acids. Broccoli sprouts have been found to contain 50 times as much of the antioxidant sulfurophane as mature broccoli. Wheat Grass juice is the closest substance to hemoglobin known and is therefore a phenomenal blood purifier and liver de-toxifier. Sprouts contain enzymes, giving your body a much needed rest as they digest themselves – invigorating you while requiring no help from your body to process them. New research indicates that peanut sprouts reduce harmful cholesterol and that sunflower, buckwheat and grain sprouts dramatically improve the quality of life of diabetics. The list goes on and on.
    All edible grains, seeds and legumes can be sprouted. Generally the following are used for sprouting :
    Grains: Wheat, maize, ragi, bajra and barley.
    Seeds: Alfalfa seeds, radish seeds, fenugreek seeds, carrot seeds, coriander seeds,
    pumpkin seeds and muskmelon seeds.
    Legumes: Mung, Bengal gram, groundnut and peas.
    Alfalfa, as the name in Arabic signifies, is the king of all sprouts. Grown as a plant, its roots are known to burrow as much as 12 meters into the subsoil to bring up valuable trace minerals of which manganese is especially important to health and digestion ; it is a vital component of human insulin. Apart from minerals, alfalfa is also a rich source of vitamins A,B,C,E and K and amino acids. Sesame seeds are another good source of nourishment. They contain all the essential amino acids in their 20 per cent protein content and higher concentration of calcium than does milk. They are high in letichin, unsaturated fats, vitamin E and vitamin B complex, besides other live nutrients.

    Rest of the article here: http://ybertaud9.wordpress.com/2012/...eds-of-health/
    Wow,thank you so much! We were debating whether a l l could really be eaten,but it seems so,yes. I will go read the rest tonight.


  5. View Post #29
    United States Member Brook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 10 2012
    Posts
    74
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 82 Times
    in 29 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Good! Glad you enjoyed the article. I particularly like alfalfa sprouts on a sandwich....yummy!

    I happen to be in the middle of planting this years garden this weekend. today I should be able to finish planting the seeds. Last year was my very first attempt at gardening. I moved to the country in 2010...I'm a city girl. It was a lot of work but well worth the lesson. This year I'm changing it up a bit. It's bigger and I have more variety.

    I'll share here:

    Okay then...here is a pic of last years garden....this year the area is just past where the two garden chairs are



    We had an over abundance of these...



    And These...



    And these.....



    So I had to do the unthinkable (remember I'm a city girl)...and learn not waste the crop. Gave some to the neighbors, had a cook off....



    I even learned to can for storage (That was a big step for me...lol)







    bottom line is....If I can do it............anybody can



  6. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Brook For This Useful Post:

    Bethany (15th April 2012), Dreamwalker (15th April 2012), JulietsBleedingToo (15th April 2012), Kindling (15th April 2012), lightblue (15th April 2012), pillaroflight (15th April 2012), Raven (15th April 2012)

  7. View Post #30
    Europe Self-Mod Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 8 2012
    Location
    Nevereverland
    Posts
    220
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    281
    Thanked 543 Times
    in 173 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Brook View Post
    Okay then...here is a pic of last years garden....this year the area is just past where the two garden chairs are
    Wow Brook that is amazing!
    Thank you for sharing!!


  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Raven For This Useful Post:

    Brook (15th April 2012), lightblue (15th April 2012)

  9. View Post #31
    Europe Self-Mod Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 8 2012
    Location
    Nevereverland
    Posts
    220
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    281
    Thanked 543 Times
    in 173 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by sjkted View Post
    Have you had any trouble getting them to grow inside? This is my first time trying to do seedlings in an Alpine setting. I think next year I'll get a grow lamp as it's taken about a month for them to start making minimal progress, and this is after the majority dying. The seeds I have are suited for high altitude and cold conditions.
    That is why I am trying this Biodynamic Gardening thing now.
    I am still reading up on how and why. There is a calender that you can follow.
    my seeds are growing better than I thought. I might end up selling most plants
    cause I have only very limited space. my garden will be mostly vertical.
    I planted the whole package of seeds for arugula and it seems they all grew!

    modwiz thank you so much for the link!
    I have a hard time finding good information about it, at least in digital form.

    Today you can plant root plants until 7 pm.
    tomorrow is all flower day until tuesday 10 am.
    I am trying to see if it does matter what kind of planting time it is.
    So I will put some carrott seeds down when it is root time and then when it is flower time.
    just to see if it makes a difference in growth.
    Maybe that is why your plants were dying sjkted?


  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Raven For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (15th April 2012)

  11. View Post #32
    Prolific Member Janos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2 2011
    Location
    The woods
    Posts
    1,405
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    1,284
    Thanked 4,148 Times
    in 1,129 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Some sprouts are downright toxic. Tomato sprouts for example, being a Solanum.

    "Neglect not the small things, for all intrigues, and wars and truths are naught but small things, one built upon the other. Begin then, with the small, and look close, and ye will see it all."
    FYI: Dandelions are one of a few plants that are 100% edible. Flowers, stems, leaves, roots. Everything. Remember that, as it may save your life one day. Learn more here: http://wildcookery.wordpress.com/

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Janos For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (15th April 2012), sjkted (15th April 2012)

  13. View Post #33
    UK Senior Member Dreamwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 14 2011
    Age
    46
    Posts
    685
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    963
    Thanked 1,773 Times
    in 540 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    thanks Brook ,well i know who to ask when i need some advice.


  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Dreamwalker For This Useful Post:

    Brook (15th April 2012)

  15. View Post #34
    Prolific Member Dex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 3 2011
    Location
    Northeastern US
    Posts
    1,451
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    2,262
    Thanked 2,896 Times
    in 1,105 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Janos View Post
    Some sprouts are downright toxic. Tomato sprouts for example, being a Solanum.
    I was thinking the same thing. Probably peppers and eggplant as well.

    Enjoy every sandwich. -- Warren Zevon
    The future is unwritten. -- Joe Strummer
    Let love rule. -- Lenny Kravitz
    Every kind of ignorance in the world all results from not realizing that our perceptions are gambles. We believe what we see and then we believe our interpretation of it, we don't even know we are making an interpretation most of the time. We think this is reality. ? Robert Anton Wilson

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to Dex For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (15th April 2012)

  17. View Post #35
    United States Member Brook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 10 2012
    Posts
    74
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 82 Times
    in 29 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Actually there are two concerns for sprouting. One is Bacterial infection, and the other is Antinutritional factors or 'toxins'.

    Bacterial infection

    FDA health warning on a sprouts packaging

    Commercially grown sprouts are associated with multiple outbreaks of harmful bacteria like salmonella or the toxic forms of Escherichia coli. Such infections, which are so frequent in the United States that investigators call them "sproutbreaks", may be a result of contaminated seeds or of unhygienic production with high microbial counts. Sprout seeds can become contaminated in the fields where they are grown, and sanitizing steps may be unable to kill bacteria hidden in damaged seeds. A single surviving bacterium in a kilogram of seed can be enough to contaminate a whole batch of sprouts, according to the FDA.

    To minimize the impact of the incidents and maintain public health, both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Health Canada issued industry guidance on the safe manufacturing of edible sprouts and public education on their safe consumption. There are also publications for hobby farmers on safely growing and consuming sprouts at home. The recommendations include development and implementation of good agricultural practices and good manufacturing practices in the production and handling of seeds and sprouts, seed disinfection treatments, and microbial testing before the product enters the food supply.

    In June 2011, contaminated bean sprouts in Germany were identified as the source of the 2011 E. coli O104:H4 outbreak. In addition to Germany, where 3,792 cases and 42 deaths had been reported as of 22 June, a handful of cases have been reported in several countries including Switzerland, Poland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, the UK, Canada and the USA. Essentially all affected people had been in Germany shortly before becoming ill.


    Antinutritional factors

    Some legumes, including sprouts, can contain toxins or antinutritional factors, which can be reduced by soaking, sprouting and cooking (e.g., stir frying). Joy Larkcom advises that to be on the safe side “one shouldn’t eat large quantities of raw legume sprouts on a regular basis, no more than about 550g (20oz) daily”.

    Phytic acid, an antinutritional factor, occurs primarily in the seed coats and germ tissue of plant seeds. It forms insoluble or nearly insoluble compounds with many metal ions, including those of calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc, reducing their dietary availability. Diets high in phytic acid content and poor in these minerals produce mineral deficiency in experimental animals (Gontzea and Sutzescu, 1958, as cited in Chavan and Kadam, 1989)[citation needed]. The latter authors state that the sprouting of cereals has been reported to decrease levels of phytic acid. Similarly, Shipard (2005)[citation needed] states that enzymes of germination and sprouting can help eliminate detrimental substances such as phytic acid. However, the amount of phytic acid reduction from soaking is only marginal, and not enough to counteract its antinutrient effects .

    But the benefits are great as well. As long as you handle the seeds with care, washing them and not letting them sit in the fridge till they expire....it's probably safe as with anything there is always a chance of bacteria or toxin. It's always advisable to follow common sense in those areas of concern.

    Here's a wiki link where I got this information along with some other facts and recommended kinds of seeds that are suitable for sprouting.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprouting



  18. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Brook For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (23rd April 2012), lightblue (15th April 2012), pillaroflight (15th April 2012)

  19. View Post #36
    Prolific Member Janos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2 2011
    Location
    The woods
    Posts
    1,405
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    1,284
    Thanked 4,148 Times
    in 1,129 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    1.) 'Bacterial infection' is only an issue where unclean practices are permitted. In other words, 'commercial'. Doing it in your home isn't typically an issue.

    2.) Everything is a toxin in large enough quantities. Even water. I'd not eat a whole bunch of bean sprouts in one sitting every day, for the rest of eternity, but a half cup to a cup a day isn't going to hurt anyone. Things that are toxic are mostly so in massive quantities. Like in, you'd have to force-feed yourself like a lab rat. No normal individual is going to do that.

    I kind of laughed at the 'seed disinfection' part. That's actually quite funny. I really doubt that I'm going to die from anything that is on something I sprout, but hey... gotta be 'safe', right?

    3.) Wikipedia is absolutely the worst source on the planet to be using in regard to edible plants and anything else dealing with something you consume. They're so horrid that on some foraging forums it's practically forbidden to link to wikipedia, because it is so deadly inaccurate in most cases. Literally deadly inaccurate. It'll say something is edible, when it isn't, or vice versa, etc.

    4.) Most of the information on the net, especially in the case of edibles of any kind suffers from the horrible 'Copy/Paste' malady. That is, it's posted inaccurately one place, and then is endlessly copy/pasted all over the net by well meaning people that don't know their Amaranth from their Acorn.

    "Neglect not the small things, for all intrigues, and wars and truths are naught but small things, one built upon the other. Begin then, with the small, and look close, and ye will see it all."
    FYI: Dandelions are one of a few plants that are 100% edible. Flowers, stems, leaves, roots. Everything. Remember that, as it may save your life one day. Learn more here: http://wildcookery.wordpress.com/

  20. View Post #37
    United States Member Brook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 10 2012
    Posts
    74
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 82 Times
    in 29 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Yes..wiki is not the best source....I've been around long enough to know that. But in this case it's a quick easy way to source some basic information in the long run. They even had your basic information on the tomato seeds:

    All the sprouts of the solanaceae (tomato, potato, paprika, aubergine or eggplant) and rhubarb cannot be eaten as sprouts, either cooked or raw, as they can be poisonous. Some sprouts can be cooked to remove the toxin, while others cannot


    Let me ask you...should I simply refrain from posting on this forum? Say the word and I will comply. My only intention here is to add to the mix. Copy and paste is not the norm for me either. Most that know me complain on my long winded text. Which is strictly me.


  21. The Following User Says Thank You to Brook For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (23rd April 2012)

  22. View Post #38
    Prolific Member KristenAnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 10 2012
    Posts
    1,080
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1,222 Times
    in 702 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Hi Raven! Great post! Rudolf Steiner was so interesting and made such great contributions to society. The interesting thing was that he was clairvoyant. I studied Anthroposophy for 2 years in the mid '70s. Some of my classmates went into Biodynamic farming. There are many degrees of getting into it. Those who are REALLY super into it even plant at certain times and cycles of the moon. The thing is, being clairvoyant, Steiner related to the elemental beings of each plant. It's very interesting.

    Thanks!
    Kristen



  23. The Following User Says Thank You to KristenAnn For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (23rd April 2012)

  24. View Post #39
    Europe Self-Mod Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 8 2012
    Location
    Nevereverland
    Posts
    220
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    281
    Thanked 543 Times
    in 173 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    Hi Raven! Great post! Rudolf Steiner was so interesting and made such great contributions to society. The interesting thing was that he was clairvoyant. I studied Anthroposophy for 2 years in the mid '70s. Some of my classmates went into Biodynamic farming. There are many degrees of getting into it. Those who are REALLY super into it even plant at certain times and cycles of the moon. The thing is, being clairvoyant, Steiner related to the elemental beings of each plant. It's very interesting.

    Thanks!
    Kristen
    Hi Kristen! Thanks! Honestly I don't know crazy much about it. I hoped some members would have some knowledge and share. I am reading a book right now about the theory behind it.
    Rudolf Steiner is a fascinating person.
    If you know more about it - I would love to learn!

    the color of your post is super light (probably to fit your avatar picture).
    It is hard to read on a white background (i use "Winter" as theme).
    Look:

    Name:  Bild 16.png
Views: 44
Size:  111.9 KB


  25. The Following User Says Thank You to Raven For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (23rd April 2012)

  26. View Post #40
    Prolific Member Janos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2 2011
    Location
    The woods
    Posts
    1,405
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    1,284
    Thanked 4,148 Times
    in 1,129 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Brook View Post
    Yes..wiki is not the best source....I've been around long enough to know that. But in this case it's a quick easy way to source some basic information in the long run. They even had your basic information on the tomato seeds:

    Let me ask you...should I simply refrain from posting on this forum? Say the word and I will comply. My only intention here is to add to the mix. Copy and paste is not the norm for me either. Most that know me complain on my long winded text. Which is strictly me.
    I was simply trying to convey that wikipedia is in general, a less than reliable source when it comes to edible anything. Nothing more, nothing less. Yes, they do get some stuff right. But they get just about as much wrong. When you are dealing with things like that, do you really want to take that kind of chance? I don't.

    How you got that you should refrain from posting on this forum by what I said about wikipedia... I have no idea. By all means, please post on this forum.

    By the way, point #4 in my earlier point was referring to so called 'experts', and had nothing to do with ye at all, in case that is where the miscommunication came in. One expert will quote something, then everyone else automatically assumes it's right never checking for themselves. In fact the 'father' of modern foraging Mr. Euell Gibbons said that common milkweed was bitter and was toxic raw, and had to be boiled in THREE changes of water.

    Well, Euell in this case was full of it. Common Milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, isn't bitter at all. Can be eaten raw, and requires only one boiling if you want to cook it. He either got one of the other (toxic) milkweeds confused, or accidentally boiled a bunch of dogbane. So much for the infallibility of the 'experts', eh?

    But go all over the net, and you'll find post, after post, after post that common milkweed is bitter, mildly toxic, and requires boiling in three changes of water before consumption.

    By the way, if you notice that Wikipedia has this one RIGHT, it's because it was changed and corrected (finally) after Dr. John Kallas' book came out correcting the above misconception. So, kudos for them on that at least.

    Last edited by Janos; 16th April 2012 at 01:57.
    "Neglect not the small things, for all intrigues, and wars and truths are naught but small things, one built upon the other. Begin then, with the small, and look close, and ye will see it all."
    FYI: Dandelions are one of a few plants that are 100% edible. Flowers, stems, leaves, roots. Everything. Remember that, as it may save your life one day. Learn more here: http://wildcookery.wordpress.com/

  27. The Following User Says Thank You to Janos For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (23rd April 2012)

  28. View Post #41
    Prolific Member KristenAnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 10 2012
    Posts
    1,080
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1,222 Times
    in 702 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    [COLOR="#F0FFF0"]Hi Raven! Oh! Sorry about he color. I'm so new to this. How about if I use white? I tried to find "winter" or whatever it was you mentioned, but couldn't find it.

    Anyway! My classes at the Waldorf Inst. were FASCINATING! We learned about the purpose of mankind, the ancient history ("pre-history") of Earth & humans etc. One of my favorite classes was "Karma & Reincarnation". Our clairvoyant prof. studies biographies as a hobby because he could "see" who people had been in the past & what actions & decisions led to certain circumstances in a later life. We studied famous people & what things/decisions/actions in one life led to certain circumtances in later lives. Extremely interesting. But ALL THE CLASSES were fascinating! ;-)

    But I digress! ;-) The fascinating thing about Steiner, regarding bio-dynamic farming, was that he could SEE the elemental beings in everything. So could my prof I think. My prof. knew when we came back from lunch if we had eaten certain food with not-so-good energy or elementals. He could see it in our auras. Interestingly, we were advised NOT to eat anything in the "Deadly Nightshade" family. That their energy & elementals are not beneficial to humans. That includes tomatoes, potatoes, not sweet potatoes or yams, gogi berries, eggplant, all peppers (bell, green, hot, etc)eggplant. We were told also that anything that grows underground or in the dark is NOT beneficial to humans. And that if you're strict into this, to stay away from them. This includes ESPECIALLY to avoid mushrooms. Carrotts are ok tho - because their leafy parts above the ground absorb the energy of the sunlight & bring it to the carrot. Other than that, I don't really know anything else about bio-dynamic farming, tho I have friends who went into it.

    Have a good day! Is this color of text better?
    Kristen[
    /COLOR]


  29. View Post #42
    Europe Self-Mod Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 8 2012
    Location
    Nevereverland
    Posts
    220
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    281
    Thanked 543 Times
    in 173 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    Hi Raven! Oh! Sorry about he color. I'm so new to this. How about if I use white? I tried to find "winter" or whatever it was you mentioned, but couldn't find it.
    no biggie! It takes some time to find all the buttons. The themes including "winter" are on the very bottom on the left side.
    It is a drop down menu that changes the layout of the entire page. the default one has a dark background.



    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    The fascinating thing about Steiner, regarding bio-dynamic farming, was that he could SEE the elemental beings in everything. So could my prof I think. My prof. knew when we came back from lunch if we had eaten certain food with not-so-good energy or elementals.
    I am going to read a book about Steiners work right after I am done with this calendar/book about Biodynamics.
    I will read it in german though so I don't have the lost in translation problem.






    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    Interestingly, we were advised NOT to eat anything in the "Deadly Nightshade" family. That their energy & elementals are not beneficial to humans. That includes tomatoes, potatoes, not sweet potatoes or yams, gogi berries, eggplant, all peppers (bell, green, hot, etc)eggplant. We were told also that anything that grows underground or in the dark is NOT beneficial to humans. And that if you're strict into this, to stay away from them. This includes ESPECIALLY to avoid mushrooms. Carrotts are ok tho - because their leafy parts above the ground absorb the energy of the sunlight & bring it to the carrot.
    oh no those are my favorite vegetables!!
    I couldn't live without tomatoes!
    I hardly ever run out of tomatoes.
    Peppers are delicious! tomatoes and peppers don't grow in the dark though?

    Mushrooms I heard that before. It had to do with bacteria in your intestants that
    feed on them or something.


    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    Anyway! My classes at the Waldorf Inst. were FASCINATING! We learned about the purpose of mankind, the ancient history ("pre-history") of Earth & humans etc. One of my favorite classes was "Karma & Reincarnation". Our clairvoyant prof. studies biographies as a hobby because he could "see" who people had been in the past & what actions & decisions led to certain circumstances in a later life. We studied famous people & what things/decisions/actions in one life led to certain circumtances in later lives. Extremely interesting. But ALL THE CLASSES were fascinating! ;-)
    you might find some interesting discussions on that topic here: http://nexus.2012info.ca/forum/forum...8-Spirituality
    this is the archive with old threads but I found good input there a lot of times.

    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    Have a good day! Is this color of text better?
    You too! yes that color works perfectly!

    "When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging" Will Rogers

  30. View Post #43
    Prolific Member KristenAnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 10 2012
    Posts
    1,080
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1,222 Times
    in 702 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    [QUOTE=Raven;74088]no biggie! It takes some time to find all the buttons. The themes including "winter" are on the very bottom on the left side.
    It is a drop down menu that changes the layout of the entire page. the default one has a dark background.

    Ok. Thanks! ;-)

    I am going to read a book about Steiners work right after I am done with this calendar/book about Biodynamics.
    I will read it in german though so I don't have the lost in translation problem.

    Wow! How terrific that you can read in German! ;-) Excellent in this case. You'll be able to see how fascinating Steiner was. And in his own language! He was a genius who made breakthru's in every field. He even prescribed medicines before they were "discovered". He was more amazing than Cayce because his profound clairvoyance was permanent and always, not just when he was in a trance or unconscious.

    I loved hearing about ancient Atlantis and Lemuria, the continent in the Pacific even before Atlantis. That was the first book I found in my hometown library. Now it's published with the title "Cosmic Memory", and gives fascinating details on the societies and life back then. But I loved hearing and learning about EVERYTHING Steiner said and wrote.

    oh no those are my favorite vegetables!!
    I couldn't live without tomatoes!
    I hardly ever run out of tomatoes.
    Peppers are delicious! tomatoes and peppers don't grow in the dark though?

    Mushrooms I heard that before. It had to do with bacteria in your intestants that
    feed on them or something.

    I know! But this is what my prof. said -- you can't be a fanatic about anything. These are just guidelines. No one -- except the Anthropop (that's what we called Anthroposophists as students ;-) !) fanatics doesn't eat ANY of those foods. The whole legume family was said to have not that great of energy. This includes all kinds of beans and things it would be too hard to live without. But especially to stay away from peanuts -- which I mostly do now. Even then it's hard to avoid sometime
    Have a nice day! Kristen



    you might find some interesting discussions on that topic here: http://nexus.2012info.ca/forum/forum...8-Spirituality
    this is the archive with old threads but I found good input there a lot of times.

    I'll check it out. Thanks! ;-)

    You too! yes that color works perfectly![/QUOTE
    Good! I still don't see the "theme" thing . . .


  31. View Post #44
    Europe Self-Mod Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 8 2012
    Location
    Nevereverland
    Posts
    220
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    281
    Thanked 543 Times
    in 173 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    But especially to stay away from peanuts -- which I mostly do now.
    what is up with peanuts?
    and what about peanut sprouts?
    Americans eat more peanuts than any other people I have met.

    if you want to quote something from someone's post, you just highlight it in the text
    and this little link comes up that says "quote". Once you klick on it, it will open the
    writing window below the post that you are quoting.

    "When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging" Will Rogers

  32. View Post #45
    Prolific Member Janos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2 2011
    Location
    The woods
    Posts
    1,405
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    1,284
    Thanked 4,148 Times
    in 1,129 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    If one is getting seeds to sprout, you'll want to be sure to get them from a reputable seed company that uses organic open pollinated and non-hybrid seeds.

    These folks have a pretty good deal on sprouts. You can also get regular seeds there. http://bit.ly/HQbEYr

    "Neglect not the small things, for all intrigues, and wars and truths are naught but small things, one built upon the other. Begin then, with the small, and look close, and ye will see it all."
    FYI: Dandelions are one of a few plants that are 100% edible. Flowers, stems, leaves, roots. Everything. Remember that, as it may save your life one day. Learn more here: http://wildcookery.wordpress.com/

  33. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Janos For This Useful Post:

    Dex (17th April 2012), JulietsBleedingToo (23rd April 2012), Raven (19th April 2012)

  34. View Post #46
    Prolific Member KristenAnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 10 2012
    Posts
    1,080
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1,222 Times
    in 702 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Raven View Post
    what is up with peanuts?
    and what about peanut sprouts?
    Americans eat more peanuts than any other people I have met.

    if you want to quote something from someone's post, you just highlight it in the text
    .
    Thanks! Sorry! I actually posted, or thought I posted, a response to this days ago -- but I didn't press the right thing to get it posted. ;-)

    Anyway! Yes, I know -- peanuts are such a staple in America. Evidently tho the energy/elemental beings of peanuts go against what would be positive growth in humans. In other words, they're not good for humans, from a finer spiritual standpoint. It's really hard to get away from everything with peanuts in, and it's good anyway not to be fanatical about anything. But I find it so interesting that as children are being born more and more sensitive, that they have more and more allergies to foods -- sometimes fatal allergies -- and especially in the case of peanuts. So much so that they were once a staple on flights, but have permanently been removed from flights for that reason.

    I was noticing lastnite that there are quite a few workshops on bio-dynamic gardening. You might want to check it out to learn more. I was so fascinated with our class on it. Tho I don't remember specifics, it was so interesting to hear about the deepest levels of it. I mean, there are degrees of following bio dynamic procedures. For those who are deepest into it, they get totally into involvement with the energies/elementals of both the earth & the plants. And even the moon cycles. For those really into it, they do their planting at a certain hour in the middle of the nite at a certain phase of the moon. It's very interesting. But I don't think most people go that far with it.

    Have a nice day!
    Kristen


  35. The Following User Says Thank You to KristenAnn For This Useful Post:

    Raven (24th April 2012)

  36. View Post #47
    Europe Self-Mod Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 8 2012
    Location
    Nevereverland
    Posts
    220
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    281
    Thanked 543 Times
    in 173 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    But I find it so interesting that as children are being born more and more sensitive, that they have more and more allergies to foods -- sometimes fatal allergies -- and especially in the case of peanuts. So much so that they were once a staple on flights, but have permanently been removed from flights for that reason
    what worries me is that so many people now are starting to allergic to things like gluten. I never even knew what gluten was before people had allergies. Then there are a lot that can't do lactose any more. I have stayed away from milk for quiet a while. Usually I just need it for Kefir production. Soy beans are supposed to be bad for you as well. You get ellevated thyroid levels. So no Soy for me any more either.
    Peanuts are so big here. Especially penaut butter. It is in everything. they even put it in pretzels.



    Quote Originally Posted by KristenAnn View Post
    For those who are deepest into it, they get totally into involvement with the energies/elementals of both the earth & the plants. And even the moon cycles. For those really into it, they do their planting at a certain hour in the middle of the nite at a certain phase of the moon. It's very interesting. But I don't think most people go that far with it.
    I got a calender that shows me when to plant things. it calculates the signs and explains why and what.
    You can plant things throughtout the day. The signs are not showing cause it is daytime but they are still there.
    The calenders name is "Stalla Natura" and the ISBN is 978-0-9795530-8-0

    Today is Root-Day. I will plant my carrots and beets today.
    Starting at 3 am until 2 am on thursday is a good time to plant any root plant.

    "When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging" Will Rogers

  37. The Following User Says Thank You to Raven For This Useful Post:

    JulietsBleedingToo (24th April 2012)

  38. View Post #48
    Prolific Member KristenAnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 10 2012
    Posts
    1,080
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1,222 Times
    in 702 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Hi Raven! My sense of it is there's no need to worry over gluten allergies. It seems to be one more thing that is not beneficial for humans. From the clairvoyant perspective, we had also been told that dairy is meant for baby cows! That it's designed to fatten them up as quickly as possible and is designed for their metabolisms. At the same time we were NOT advised to follow anything or be fanatic. To follow our inner sense of what our bodies have a need for. They were just telling us the clairvoyant deepest views of these foods. And I agree that soy is not good for humans. I've been told by several people, some of them who have natural doctor degrees, that soy is best used for counter tops. It's used for formica, but not beneficial for humans. And there again, you don't need to be fanatical about it. I've been using Bragg minerals for over a decade instead of soy sauce. It tastes pretty much the same. I see tho that it does have a smaller amount of soy products in it.

    That planting book sounds great! Thanks! ;-) Have a good day!
    Kristen


  39. The Following User Says Thank You to KristenAnn For This Useful Post:

    sandy (24th April 2012)

  40. View Post #49
    Prolific Member KristenAnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 10 2012
    Posts
    1,080
    Status
    Offline
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1,222 Times
    in 702 Posts

    Re: Biodynamic Gardening

    Raven, and everyone else into biodynamic gardening! I was just searching for info that Steiner said about the coming powerful transit of Venus, when I came across this page on biodynamic farming. Just thought you may like to check it out. http://www.jpibiodynamics.org/calend...ecommendations

    Recently I re-connected with one of my favorite teachers. This man is a healer who now lives in Calif. In his 80s by now. He's originally from England, and speaks with such a wonderful voice, and in such a deeply poetic way. You really sense that you're in the presence of a great soul when you're with him. Even reading his emails are a profound experience. ;-) He words things like a sage from ancient times.

    Anyway! I recently got an email sent by him thru his secretary who does the emailing. He said to pay attention to this Transit of Venus June 5th. That Steiner had said it will be an opening for a new beginning, and on a personal level it will be a time for a powerful healing. He said to pay attention to where it would be best to be -- to celebrate this transit. By acknowledging it in this way you make yourself especially accessible to the healing energies.

    Take care!
    Kristen



  41. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to KristenAnn For This Useful Post:

    flower (14th May 2012), JulietsBleedingToo (15th May 2012), sandy (14th May 2012)

+ Reply to Thread

Visitors found this page by searching for:

Nobody landed on this page from a search engine, yet!
SEO Blog

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •