Nationwide Indigenous warning system ‘is truly terrible and much needed’

In 1999, Stephanie Harpe’s mother was murdered and Harpe’s life was also threatened.

She works to stop historical patterns that hurt people like her.

“I’m with people, picking up their voices and just trying to help as much as I can in these dire and critical situations,” said Harpe, who is an international advocate for murdered or missing and exploited indigenous peoples.

These situations persist.

The search for Frank Young is now in its third week and no Amber Alert has been issued when he disappeared. Police only send them when they believe the children are in imminent danger, they said.

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Hope and resilience remain in search of missing 5-year-old Frank Young

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Harpe says a new system would better protect and reflect what’s going on.

“This national warning system is really urgent and essential because we are not treated the same in this country,” said Harpe. “We are very targeted and don’t have the supports we need.”


Click to play the video: “Residential schools, a source of intergenerational trauma for Aboriginal people”







Residential schools source of intergenerational trauma for Aboriginal people


Residential schools a source of intergenerational trauma for Indigenous people – July 16, 2021

Sharing Harpe’s displeasure is Dan Martel. That’s why he and his wife founded Aboriginal Alert, a popular website with profiles of missing people.

“What we want to do is be that center that brings information together that can be that second point of contact to make sure these things come out so people don’t always struggle and get lost,” said Martel said.

This week alone, the website launched its own alert system.

“When people sign up to become a member, for example — or we call them a community champion — we give them instructions to alert them when people go missing in their area within a 100 kilometer radius,” Martel said.

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It’s a start, they say. Martel and Harpe want a government-run national alert system that can reach phones in every province.

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Advocates call for Indigenous warning system

Saskatchewan Public Safety Minister Christine Tell said the current Amber Alert program is being reviewed.

“It does not distinguish between a First Nations person and any other person when we look at Amber Alerts,” Tell said. “What the circumstances are, that’s what they’re looking at. But like I said they are doing a review, when that will happen I don’t know.

Until change happens, Harpe and Martel say they will continue to push to sound the alarm on the alarms that aren’t going off.


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Hope and resilience remain in search of missing 5-year-old Frank Young


Hope and resilience remain in search of missing 5-year-old Frank Young

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